Chhatrapti Shivaji International Airport (Terminal 2 Building) by Lucas Blair Simpson
2014 - 2015, Platinum A' Architecture, Building and Structure Design Award Winner
Inspiration
Inspired by the form of traditional Indian pavilions, the four-story terminal stacks a grand “headhouse,” or central processing podium, on top of highly adaptable and modular concourses below. The terminal’s structural design prioritizes modular construction for economy and facilitation of an accelerated construction schedule. Just as the terminal celebrates a new global, high-tech identity for Mumbai, the structure is imbued with responses to the local setting, history, and culture. Regional patterns and textures are subtly integrated into the terminal’s architecture at all scales. From the articulated coffered treatment on the headhouse columns and roof surfaces to the intricate jali window screens that filter dappled light into the concourses, Terminal 2 demonstrates the potential for a modern airport to view tradition anew.
Creativity
Located in the heart of Mumbai, the new hub adds 4.4 million square feet of space to accommodate 40 million passengers per year. By orchestrating the complex web of passengers and planes into a design that feels intuitive and responds to the region’s rocketing growth, the new Terminal 2 asserts the airport’s place as a preeminent gateway to India. The primary design feature of the building is a long-span roof covering a total of 70 000 m2, one of the largest roofs in the world without an expansion joint. The Terminal also includes the largest and longest cable wall system in the world.
Design Challenges
The construction site of the new terminal building was located in close proximity to the existing terminal which had to remain fully operational during construction. This site requirement inspired the elongated X-shape plan of the terminal, which could both mold around existing structures and incorporate modular designs to accommodate rapid and phased construction. In response to site constraints, the megacolumns were designed to serve as primary hoist mechanisms such that the entire roof could be constructed without the use of tower cranes.
Production Technology
From an engineering point of view, the Chhatrapti Shivaji International Airport Terminal 2 Building by Lucas Blair Simpson is a good example of a highly-developed project.
       
     
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